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to the united nations susan rice, of course, blaming the intelligence community for her claim that the benghazi consulate terror attacks grew out of a protest over an anti-muslim film. just before the election, she repeated what she describes as a preliminary assessment on five different sunday talk shows before the truth emerged that it was, in fact, a coordinated terror attack carried out after consulate security had asked for more security. joining us now is john bolton, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations. he's a fox news contributor, and it's always good the see you, sir, thanks very much for your time. >> glad to be with you. rick: she based her statements solely and squarely on intelligence. what do you think of her comments? >> well, i think she's made a mistake personally and professionally. you'll notice from that clip you just ran she was standing at the press stakeout position outside the security council where you respond to reporters' questions. she was reading from a prepared statement. you'll see she was looking down. so this, this was carefully thought out in advance.
was a terrorist attack. but that isn't what the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice said when she went on national television five days after the attack. today rice is up on capitol hill. she's explaining what happened and some big-name republicans clearly are not very happy with her answers. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following what's become a pretty long day -- a tiring day for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. what's the latest, dana? >> reporter: wolf, the three republican senators who had vowed to block susan rice from being secretary of state if the president nominates her had really softened the rhetoric in recent days. i'm told the reason for that was because it was a curtesy in order for them to wait until they had a face-to-face meeting with her which was today. after that meeting their criticism was harsher than ever. the way these grim-faced gop senators tell it, susan rice's attempt to calm their criticism backfired. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get. >> i'm more disturbed now than i
.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you know, mccain had vehemently opposed her nomination of secretary of state. now he shows signs of softening. at issue, that deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. was rice playing politics when she said initially that terrorists were not to blame for the killing of four americans? minutes ago, we caught up to senator mccain for these exclusive comments. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> do you trust her to be secretary of state? >> this issue needs to be resolved, clearly. it needs to be resolved before -- i don't make a judgment as to whether she should be secretary of state or not until she's been nominated. >> you put more blame on the president or miss rice? >> the president is ultimately responsible. >> cnn's dan lothian first reported this morning's meeting with rice and mccain. he joins us n
collins, but clearly it is her responsibility as an ambassador to the united nations to do much more than that. >> before anyone can make an intelligent and decision, we need to do a lot more. to this date, we do not have the fbi interviews of the survivors from after the attack. we do not have the basic information about what was said about the night of the attack as of this date. i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like they did not have the information needed to make the alteration to make about john bolton. democrats dug in their heels and a they were not going to consider the nomination until they would get basic answers to their concerns. the concerns i have far greater today there and they were before and we are not even close to getting a basic cancer. >> i have many more questions that need answering. >> that was about 10 minutes ago after meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice, mentioned as a possible replacement for outgoing secretary of state, hillary clinton. coming up, more discussion on the so-called fiscal cliff this timeless and a majority wit
. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of w
your ambassador to the united nations you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparations and responsibilities for that job and that is troubling to me. jenna: kelly wright, live in washington with more. kelly, the three senators just held the news briefing which we played a little bit from kelly ayotte. tell us generally what was their response? what sort of reaction they had to what they heard inside that closed-door meeting? >> reporter: let's stay on focus on that because that is really telling. each senator saw the tone being stunned by the information they heard in this closed-door meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice. they are significantly troubled they say, more than that ever, which means there are more questions than answers as a result of this meeting. even saying that rice ace comments were clearly wrong. >> what happened initially was it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo. as a consequence of the video. >> reporter: and right after that, during that news briefing that we heard, we heard from actually senator lindse
strong support for the ambassador. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job for the united nations and is qualified for a number of positions in the foreign policy arena. i will leave it at that. >> president obama shows his support of susan rice as well. he had his first white house news conference after his election. the president took exception to republican senators critical of rice. if they want to come after any one they should come after me. >> kelly wright, thank you very much. senator lindsay graham is one of the three senators who have a lot of questions for ambassador rice. >> he gave us a preview of what he will be looking for during today's discussion. >> she asked to meet with us i will listen to what she has to say about her role in benghazi. the more i know about benghazi the more upset i am that the consulate was even open on september 11th. when you look at the history about the dangers we should never have been open or heavily reinforced. during the attack i am more core idea about how we couldn't help them for 7 hours. a spontaneous event caused by video turn nu
and then on friday will hit the road traveling to pennsylvania. >>> the u.s. ambassador to the united nations is back on capitol hill today to meet with more lawmakers. susan rice is trying to explain comments she made shortly after the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. yesterday she met with three of her strongest critics in the senate including arizona republican john mccain. rice initially said the attack had grown out of a spontaneous protest. now she says those were the talking points that u.s. intelligence had given her. >> we're going to get to the bottom of this. we have to have a system we can trust. and if you don't know what happened, just say you don't know what happened. >> mccain said he is still troubled about what rice said and what she did not say. rice would need senate support if president obama nominates her to become the next secretary of state. >>> time now 4:42. how a dangerous mix can be deadly. the juice that could be deadly when mixed with the wrong medication. >> also ahead is it a revolutionary breakthrough worthy of a willy wonka? how cadbury invented nonme
nations envoy. the united states doesn't have a presidential envoy to deal with this crisis. these are low-cost solutions. having that kind of international peace process that brings pressure to bear on the parties, rwanda supporting the rebels, uganda supporting the process, the government is creating problems in the east as well. they need to be preshed into looking at the root causes since this cycle of violence began. >> is there anything that people can link sometimes, you have people who are suffering, wars taking place in that area. >> yeah. thanks for asking for that because the link between all of us who buy these products, like laptops and cell phones, and the violence is congo is very direct. it's sourced from the congo. so a major international effort has -- is under way just like the blood diamonds movement a decade and a half ago for sierra leonne and trying to drive that international market, that supply chain to be a more peaceful and legally developed. so that's really the objective. join up in some of those international efforts, go on raisehopeforco raisehopeforco raiseh
.n., that is the date of the so-called partition of palestine resolution, dating back to 1947 by united nations. that has symbolic meaning as well. and the israelis, not only the israelis have opposed it, but the united states has opposed it. and it will pass most likely because this is a general assembly issue not a security council issue. to but the united states -- -- they are trying to make a point by retaliating in some big way. that will have a cost for the palestinian authority. what does that mean? hamas will emerge as an even bigger winner. there will say, look at what he is getting you have got to vote, but what good did that to do? our way is the best day. get missiles. so that is the political dilemma for the united states. host: leila on our line for independents, go ahead. caller: my comment is, you always have to negotiate with people. when negotiated not only with friends, but with enemies. the enemies have to be [indiscernible] what we initially wanted to do when we sent the president oversees. -- once and for all. guest: hamas is delivering in gazgaza. my own position, just fo
support. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job at the united nations and highly qualified for any number of positions in the foreign policy arena and i will leave it at that. >> today's meeting place between ambassador rice and her staunchest critics on capitol hill. after his reelection president obama took exception to republican senators critical of rice saying if they want to come after anyone they should come after me. >> gretchen: we remember that. why is no one talking about susan rice, she went out on the talk shows and got the talking points from the white house and said what they wanted her to say. >> brian: she said the intelligence. >> gretchen: that's why she would be secretary of state. she did what she was asked to do and did it well and it worked with the electorate you could argue and now she will be secretary of state. what is going to stop it? >> steve: not necessarily. senate aides. administration is having her sell herself up on capitol hill today and what she is doing, she is appealing to the moderates, in particular republicans from georgia and tennessee. th
of president obama pronouncements about benghazi all of the way through september 25th at the united nations. >> james i appreciate the question and there have been some very interesting answers to these questions of late. but i would make the point that as ambassador rice makes clear in this statement that those initial assessments were wrong in one key respect. there were no protests outside of the benghazi facility. to this day it is the assessment of this administration and intelligence community and certainly the assessment of your colleagues in the press who interviewed participants on the ground in the assault on our facilities in benghazi that they were -- they acted at least in part in response to what they saw happening in and took advantage of that situation. again, what your question seems to suggest is that it is more important that i or others use -- talking points provided by the intelligence community than actually what happened in benghazi. >> why did the white house stand by the claims that the video was to blame for the attack on our consulate. here is charles krauthammer'
the ambassador. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job at the united nations and is highly qualified for any number of positions in the foreign policy arena. i will leave it at that. >> reporter: bill, you may recall very quickly here that during his first white house news conference after his re-election, president obama took exception to republican senators critical of rice saying, quote if they want to come after anyone, they should come after him, after me. bill: he said it with force. kelly, thank you. waiting on the meeting in washington. martha: ambassador rice, reportedly as we were saying one of the top candidates to replace secretary of state hillary clinton and the president seemed to lay down the gauntlet to senators mccain and graham if the first news confriends after the election. kelly referred to this moment. let's look at it from november the 14th. >> if senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. martha: that is really the feistiest moment of that news conference. the president, who you see here, with ambassador s
's dealing with syria gaza, the congo. she's still our representative to the united nations. so while we're talking this foolishness about her appearance on a tv talk show, what signal is that sending to the rest of the world? i do think they've got themselves backed in a corner now. i think the other agenda going on is the senate race. so i think that it needs to stop. i hope it will today. i know she's back on the hill again today. >> bill: she is. first of all, it is unfair at so many levels. i think it is sexist and racist. ambassador to the united nations, god knows is not responsible for security. embassies and consulates around the world number one. we talked about this earlier. number two, all she did in her appearance on the sunday shows and in her testimony right after the incident in benghazi on the hill was say here is what our intelligence agencies are telling us at this point. we don't know everything about it yet. you know. and that's -- that's kind of classic. you never know, right? immediately, al
you're ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation responsibilities for that job. >> so right now, senator john mccain is speaking as part of a panel forum on syria. we're going to monitor that event. but joining me now is former white house press secretary joe lockhart to talk more about this. it's been a wild hour, definitely, to see the three senators come to the microphone and make news about the fact that they believe there is more trouble to come. they've got more questions than they do answers. a lot of fire being thrown out when a lot of people speculated, joe, maybe this would help tamper down all the criticism to susan rice. how do you think the reaction has been? do you find this to be typical? >> yeah, you know, the washington post described it as bizarre. i'll call it a very strange and weird strategy. there are legitimate questions to ask about this. any time american lives are lost, particularly those, ambassado ambassadors, those who put their lives at risk. but this is really strange. you know, senator mcc
're an ambassador to the united nations -- i want to get your thoughts on this. she said, look, you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation responsibilities. i guess the implication being that she would have been aware of other things that were different or contradicted directly to what she went and said on television. does this cast any doubt on her story? general clark has made what i've heard from everybody who knows her that she is an incredibly honest and forthright person. >> well, i think there's a bigger question here, erin, and that's the credibility of the administration on these national security issues and whether they politicized a national security issue that led to the death of four americans. i mean, i do -- i don't agree that the american people were not misled on this. i don't know how five days afterwards, a senior official -- first of all, i don't understand why susan rice was in that chair as opposed to hillary clinton as u.n. ambassador, she had nothing to do with what happened in benghazi. but besides that, you know, the issue here is why did the
questions have been answered. >> when you have a position where you'rer -- your ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation and responsibilities for that job. and that's troubling to me, as well. >> all kisay, the concerns i have are greater today than they were before. and weare not even close to getting to the basic answers. >> did we find out anything from today's meeting? ambassador john bolton is here. your thoughts on the meeting with ambassador rice on capitol hill. >> from susan rice's point of view, this is a disaster, an opportunity to try to draw the sting out of the opposition that had been expressed by senator mccain and the others. obviously went in the opposite direction, when have you all three senator who is participated in the meeting, coming out after saying they have more questions now than they did before. this was a bad meeting, no doubt about it. i think part of the problem here is the continued focus by the white house, by susan rice, by people looking at it, on these so-called talk points that somebod
as the ambassador . united nations she reviewed more than that. >> in a written statement she knows that the intelligence that she based her sunday swars on is wrong and there no spontanous demonstration and saying while we wish we had had perfect information just days after the terrorist attack as is often the case inteleassessment evolve would and neither i nor anyone in the administration intended to mislead the american people in any stage in this progress. it all comes as a memo reveals that al-qaida was organized in september to carry out attack in tunisia and egypt and yephen well size libya. much of the focused on benghazi alone. these three embassy assaults deserve scut ninny and they are all connected to the al-qaida-led network. senator carl levin said it is not fair to hold her responsible for the original talking points since she did not produce them and the intelligence community stood by them. >> gretchen: there is no shock there. democrats will support susan rice. >> brian: i was stunned by yesterday. >> gretchen: this entire thing is a political football. this is wh
transported to jail. >>> u.s. ambassador total united nations, suzy rice is defending her first account of the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provide to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. >> initially , rice had attributed the attack on the u.s. consulate to a mob angry about an anti muslim video, and not a terrorist attack. much of the criticism about the explanation for the attack has been directed at rice, because she is believed to be obama's top chows to replace hillary clinton. >>> we're learning more about the tress of -- investigation of david petraeus, investigators want to know if he instructed staff to give his biographer, class bide offerings. some accepted they are by petraeus and others to provide military records and other documents to broadwell for her work. petraeus resigned at cia director after admitting to an extramarital affair with broadwell. >>> hostess has the okay to start fading into histo
on third avenue near the united nations and something was happening city hall and john paraskivas one of my colleagues was asked to go down to city hall and file immediately but use this thing because this was the only way to file right away and it was something that was made by a company called leefax out of boston, some guys from and they were making scanning equipment to digitize negatives and take it back to wherever the printing presses were. but at any rate, john literally put on something that locked like a -- looked like scuba diving gear on his back. i kid you not. it was that big. it was a huge backpack and had a cable running into the camera. he transmitted that back to news day and made the paper and it was noisy as hell. it was a very grainy image, very messy image. it was not anything that you would see from film. but at any rate, that is the kind of stuff that people were dealing with 25 years ago. and when digital cameras first came out, i was one of the last who wanted one. >> exactly, i remember. >> because, because, because the images were very noisy, the cameras were ver
as the ambassador of a united nation to reveal more than that. >> before anyone can promote anyone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more to this date. we don't have the sea of fbi interviews of the survivors conducted one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said of the attack shared with congress as of this date. i remember the john bolton episode pretty well. our democrat friends feel like john bolton didn't have the information needed to inform a decision of john bollen to being ambassador -- >> you've been listening live to two of the three republican shares that u.n. ambassador susan rice met with this morning. that's lindsey graham of south carolina and the new hampshire senator, certainly her harshest critics. reportedly susan rice requested the meeting. the third senator was john mccain. she's considered a top pick to replace hillary clinton and if nominated rice would have to be confirmed by the senate and there's questions about the handling of the situation. this story continues in washington, d.c. it will be interesting to see
of the palestinian authority travels to the united nations this week for what he hopes will be a vote with a historic outcome. mahmoud abbas, will be present thursday as the general assembly votes on a resolution that would upgrade palestinians to the status of a non-member state. meanwhile, only one week since the cease-fire between israel and hamas, and the u.s. official tells cnn that iran is already figuring out how to resupply hamas with missiles and other weapons. >>> a flight from fort lauderdale to san juan, puerto rico, forced to circle back and land just after takeoff because of a bird strike. an inspection confirmed a bird hit the right engine of that jetblue flight yesterday. passengers were put on a different flight and arrived in san juan after a 2 1/2 hour delay. >>> monday night football action in philadelphia, kind of like a loser bowl. not a marquee match-up. the eagles and panthers, two of the worst teams in the nfl. but it was a big night for panthers qb cam newton. he threw for two touchdown passes, and he ran for two touchdowns himself. there he goes. that wasn't him. way to go,
, and we have the united nations. something was happening at city hall. one of my colleagues was asked to go down to city hall and you would be able to file at right away. there were some guys from mit, they made scanning equipment-. ves.ati john put on something that looked like scuba diving gear on his back, and it was a huge backpack and there was a cable running into the camera, and he could only get one shot off of this thing. he transmitted that image back in tuesday and it made the paper, noisy as hell. very grainy, messy image. it was nothing that you would see from film. that is the kind of stuff people were dealing with 25 years ago, and when digital cameras first came out, i was one of the last that wanted one. because the images were very noisy, the cameras were very heavy, they were big and intrusive. michele has a bigger camera that is probably more had the normal, but this is the digital camera that will make a file probably as good as the camera right there. in my opinion, this will make a beautiful file, it would blow up alanis on a poster in times square and it gives
. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her on behalf of all of our colleagues in the house, especially the washington dedication. and this -- passage of this bill is dedicated to her family and to the united states park service. i urge passage of h.r.
. >> thank you. >> coming up on c-span, live to new york city where the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the current middle east violence between israel and palestine. that is set for 330 eastern, again, on our companion network, c-span. tonight in prime time here on c-span2, author mark friedman discusses his new book, the big shift, navigating the new stage beyond midlife. he discusses how the baby boom generation is switching to new careers later in life. that begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern, again, here on c-span2. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grants saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? well, yes, he did, and i'm not going to see grant was the only person to save the union, but he was the commanding general of the army's dumping of lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia that ended the war. if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you can't. one of the things we do in history is generali
want to think how random they can get he realizes the seating arrangement at the republican national committee is going to play a crucial role in determining the nomination for the republicans and the next president of the united states. >> host: okay we will be back after a brief break. >> host: we left ourselves at the chicago convention and 1860's and we are talking about lincoln as an extreme leader as an unfiltered leader coming out of left field and you set the scene on his obscurity but he has some advantages so tell us what effect this has as the convention plays out. >> guest: his team is able to recruit supporters of cross illinois and the way they recruit them is their testing them on how weld their voices are and they bring them into chicago on discounted tickets since he was a real return he could arrange that and the print fake tickets for the convention and a stack the rafters with these lincoln supporters so every time his name is mentioned the supporters start yelling and screaming and shouting their support so much that the windows of the hall at cliche in response
. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on in vote, the yeas are 397, the nays are four. 2/3 being in the affirmative, without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the house will be in order. if you have conversations, i would suggest you take them outside. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi, mr. palazzo seek recognition? for what purpose? mr. palazzo: address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. recognized for one minute. let me see if we can quiet it down a bit. if you have conversations, please take them somewhere else other than the chamber. mr. palazzo: it is an honor to stand before you to recognize chairman hall and his work
, the campaign to fix the national debt. and a petition filed by residents to secede from the united states. washington journal, with your phone calls, tweets, and e- mail's. >> we can remember barack obama's speech in 2004, the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure and four years later, the most honorable candidate for the presidency. lincoln is a dazzling speech in new york, it is a beautiful testament to the quality of his mind, the research he does, the logical argument. when he runs for the set that, barack obama gave the speech in 2004 running for the senate in illinois. abraham lincoln ran for the senate in illinois and he lost. if you want to think about abraham lincoln in 1860, think about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weeken
successfully at the sub national level. governments in the united states, governments in china that want to attract investment, often more than their national governments want to encourage it. perhaps we can use leverage to improve ipr performance at the regional level in china. i see real possibilities there. >> please join me in thinking this terrific panel. [applause] >> join us tonight for a look at the evolution of facebook with chris cox. he advises clarke ceo zucker byrd and talks about development -- ceo zuckerberg and talks about development. tomorrow on "washington journa l," cybersecurity threats. we're joined by a former navy seal and member of the council on foreign relations. that is followed by a look at labor unions. our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. and then later we will discuss drone strategy. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> this week on "newsmakers," mary kay henry talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for. tomorow at 10:00 am and 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> what about if the soviet unio
is the negotiator. he gives part of the treaty and then he comes back to united states and the senate has to ratify it. their 96 centers at the time in 80 of them have said that they want the united states to ratify the treaty and join the league of nations under some conditions. 80 is well more than enough to make the ratification. >> host: they need two-thirds. >> guest: two-thirds, yes. ratification is not hard. you need 64 or 65. the problem is the senate republicans led by henry cabot lodge who wilson had known for many decades, they don't want to give wilson a try and. some of them are opposed to joining the treaty and they have reservations about the sovereignty. many of them are willing to join the treaty with a condition. these reservations are not huge. the british for example will eventually say they have no problem with the treaty. it's not an obstacle for them. >> host: they are not deal breakers. >> guest: they shouldn't be deal breakers. very few people view them as deal breakers. henry cabot lodge knows wilson and lodge says wilson, you know he might have reservations on the princip
to fix the national debt. then in the depositions to secede from the united states. we are joined by a georgetown university law professor. washington journal, live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slav
used increasingly by law enforcement officials in the united states. host: mike lyons is a national security analyst. he served in the army and finished his career as executive officer to the deputy chief of staff for operations in the netherlands >>. leah is the next caller. caller: week received a grant money so the police could learn to do surveillance. they are coming into the neighborhoods. they are bringing the drones close to the roof levels banging the roofs causing sleep deprivation. there is no oversight. homeland security never set the committee a up. there is also a problem with health. when you use electromagnetic close to a person, it changes the charge of the cells that causes disease. host: what about the possible health impacts? guest: if you listened to any of the cable networks during the fighting in gaza over the past weeks, you heard that the sound of the unmanned vehicles. it is designed to be used positively to look at traffic patterns. it is designed to be used in ways to help the community. in fact, the crash. they create noise. those things are not consider
to bring that forward. the diplomatic industrial and economic pieces of strategy of united states and for other countries are parts that are used to put forth those pieces that are best for those nations. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things in the interest of the united states. if that is the case, we have to have places where we can bring troops into at a moment's notice or in a short period of time and ordered to be able to, when necessary, put forth military pace. host: you would be against the drawing down some of these bases around the world? caller: i agree that some of them are unnecessary. the military has taken that into account but i am listening to the ones she is talking about and i think that is not exactly the majority. host: which ones in particular are you concerned about with regard to countries? caller: places like japan. the base in germany, i could probably agree with that. in japan, you have a force of their in north korea. north korea is not a force that people should take lightly. guest: thank you, i think ther
? >>heather: and a possible huge change in united states defense policy amid turnover in personal. owe new faces could impact our national security. d states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>gregg: time now for the top of the news. egypt's stock market taking a tumble after president morsi's taking a power grab possibly sending egypt's troubled economy into trouble. >>heather: and $27 billion needed to clean up after hurricane sandy and will go to hiring more than 5,000 unemployed people in new york. >>gregg: strong
solution to the problem. so i think with so many he could have united the people of good will to address this problem and that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until a civil war. >> if we could bring john quincy adams to the day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas. our attempt to dictate to society's the kind of society as they have to have. when he had the opportunity as the secretary of state to intervene, monroe would have done whatever he could in the pro-democracy movement so to speak he pointed out that these people have no history of self-government. religiously or politically they had never been exposed to self-government. their political culture and family culture did not tolerate. he said this is a lost cause we must not involve ourselves and said he would not involve us in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, no political history or religious history of self governance. they don't know what it means.
, quote, peacefully grant the state of texas to withdraw from the united states of america and create its own new government. as "the washington post" dana milbank put it in a recent column f obama were serious about being a good steward of the nation's finances, he would let them go. did you hear that? because many of those states are what dana milbank said are government takers, they take more in federal money than they pay in taxes. alabama gets $1.71 from the federal government for every $1 paid in taxes. louisiana gets $1.45 in federal aid for every $1 they pay in taxes. author of "bush's brain," and james braxton peterson associate professor of english at lehigh, and michael steele, former chair of the rnc and a political analyst here at msnbc. gentlemen, this is an extraordinary thing but let's talk about this, professor peterson, recent "daily beast" article you talked about using maps in 1859 to america today where states are petitioning to secede following obama's election. you write they were pro-slavery or open to slavery. this same collective of states were required to be rac
, and when you go around the world before 9-11, and you ask what they thought of the united , they admire the united states. they looked at the united states as the plays that could pull a rabbit out of i have and reinvent itself. they see a nation constrained , overreaching.mo we talked to tim geithner. can you tell other economies what to do? it has been limited. when you look at barack obama's meeting in london when the global economy was on fire, it is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet we are not going to play by the rules. it has been interesting to look at the limits we have influencing a nation like germany. i asked you, do you think america can influence the international system? i would love to see how you see the challenges ahead and put them in a geostrategic all context. >> i think it is as important as a strong military. i think economics is an answer of rebates as important as traditional policy. i think we have moved from an era where rates are the measure of a nation's strength or vulnerability to an era where sovereign interest rates are a measure of strength or vul
pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 27, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, the defense authorization bill. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, a bill to authorize aeption prosecutes for fiscal year 2013 for military activities in the department of defense and so forth and for other purposes. mr. reid: we're going to recess, as we normally do on tuesdays, from 12:30 to 2:15 to allow for our weekly caucu
nationalize health care has not worked in europe and canada and it will not work here in the united states. guest: i take issue with a couple of points. this is an entitlement society. i am glad my mother was able to get social security and medicare. she earned it and she got it. i'm sure the seniors feel they paid into the system and the earned it. payments are made into the system based on work that individuals do. when they lose their jobs, they get this insurance. they get what they pay for. entitlements.uncommo it enables them to search for jobs. the president passed a remarkable recovery act program. it wasn't as much as he wanted initially. it created or saved millions of jobs and save millions of people from falling into poverty and created the strongest unemployment insurance program the nation has ever had. host: people have paid into the unemployment insurance. "the washington times" talks about extending the benefits for one year. have americans paid in enough to cover the price tag? guest: that is something that can be made up for in future years. compared to some expenditures
. remember, open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. we can help. call unitedhealthcare to learn about medicare plans that may be right for you. call now. ♪ jon: the people behind "consumer reports" magazine raising new concerns about the nation's pork supply. they say they examined nearly 200 samples of pork with many of those samples testing positive for salmonella, lysteria and staph. to make matters worse the consumers union says 90 percent of the bacteria are actually immune to antibiotics. in other words, super bugs. but the national pork producers council president is responding saying consumers union, which runs "consumer reports", resorted to sensationalism because the science it used wouldn't stand up to even elementary scrutiny. it is another attempt by that advocacy group to push a social agenda not based on science, one if successful would take choice away from consumers. let's bring in dr. lee van nokia cure, adjunct assistant professor at lsu health science center in shreveport. they said the sample size, 200 sample, 198 samples, not very big for a scientific study. >>
so weaken the nation, that it would be very, very prone to of foreign involvement, the british were still in canada, obviously. there were certainly foreign threats that are weakened and divided united states would have been prone to. on to the second question, which is about social media and lincoln. first of all, there was plenty of social media in 1861-1865 because it was the era in which mass communications was available. the telegraph, the railroad, the newspaper or all becoming much more prevalent. many more americans were littered and reading newspapers, so people were seeing and hearing about the carnage of the war every single day. the telegraph offices would be filled with the casualty report. the other thing that changed very, very radically was that this was also the first american war that was photographed, and people were seeing photographs of the carnage. the new york times in a very, very famous review of mathew brady studio putting up a display of war scenes said that the photograph had brought the war into living rooms. so i think that certainly wasn't as prevalent
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already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to change doctors within one of the nation's largest networks, dedicated to helping you live a healthier life. other benefits can include vision and hearing coverage -- and the pharmacy saver program gives you access to prescriptions as low as $2... at thousands of pharmacies across the country, in retail locations like these. ♪ call to enroll today and enjoy these benefits... for a $0 monthly premium. most plans also include part d prescription drug coverage. your healthcare needs are unique. that's why, with over 30 years of medicare experience, we're here to guide you every step of the way. open enrollment ends december 7th. so don't wait. if you're medicare eligible, call now... and talk to unitedhealthcare about our plans, like aarp medicarecomplete. let's get you on the right path. call today. ♪ >>> as president obama, mexico's president elect meet this hour, i want to tell you about a t
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